Tuesday, January 12, 2016

Islamic invasion of Europe update (January 12, 2016)

Germany to ease deportation rules after Cologne attacks
BERLIN (AP) — The German government wants to ease the rules for deporting foreign criminals in the wake of the New Year's Eve assaults in Cologne, two senior officials said Tuesday.

The planned reform of laws on deportation and sexual offenses would "significantly" lower the legal hurdles for expelling foreigners who commit serious crimes, Interior Minister Thomas de Maiziere said.

"That's a hard but right response by the state to those who are seeking protection here, but think they can commit crimes" without consequences, de Maiziere told reporters in Berlin.

Justice Minister Heiko Maas, who announced the plans alongside de Maiziere, said that public pressure following the Cologne assaults had played a role in getting the plan agreed so quickly.

Cologne police say 553 criminal complaints have been filed with them in connection to the New Year's attacks. About 45 percent involve allegations of sexual offenses.

Police say most of the suspects are believed to be foreigners, including at least some asylum-seekers. Many were described as being of "Arab or North African origin."

The changes, which have to be approved by the Cabinet and Parliament, would mean that any custodial sentence for crimes against another person's bodily integrity, including sexual assaults, as well as violent thefts, would be grounds for deportation. Youth sentences would be covered too.

Many asylum seekers who commit crimes currently avoid deportation because the danger they face in their home country is considered greater than the reason for deporting them.

German government ordered CCTV video of Cologne train station NYE to be DELETED
The discussion was on Polish state TV’s TVP Info channel- in the “Po przecinku” (“After the comma”) program, shown on 9 January 2016.

The guests were Dr Magdalena El Ghamari, an expert on terrorism from Bia?ystok university and Dr Ryszard ?ó?taniecki, a sociologist and former diplomat.

PS Polish state TV has been the subject of some discussion recently. After the Polish elections last October, won by the right-wing, Eurosceptic “Law and Justice” party, the new government have proposed large changes to the state television, which would see government ministers directly nominating TV chiefs. Previously, the board which nominating the heads of TV was largely composed of liberals, now in opposition. As a result of the proposals, there have been some protests by the opposition, also on the streets, by the “Committee for the defence of democracy”.